California State Reopening Plan

Blueprint for Business and Activity Tiers
Sectors Widespread Tier 1 Substantial Tier 2 Moderate Tier 3 Minimal Tier 4
Critical Infrastructure Open with modifications Open with modifications Open with modifications Open with modifications
Limited Services Open with modifications Open with modifications Open with modifications Open with modifications
Hair Salons & Barbershops Open Indoors with modifications Open Indoors with modifications Open Indoors with modifications Open Indoors with modifications
All Retail (Including critical infrastructure, except standalone grocers) Open Indoors with modifications
• Max 25% capacity
Open Indoors with modifications
• Max 50% capacity
Open Indoors with modifications Open Indoors with modifications
Shopping Centers (Malls, Destination Centers, Swap Meets) Open Indoors with modifications
• Max 25% capacity
• Closed common areas
• Closed food courts
Open indoors with modifications
• Max 50% capacity
• Closed common areas
• Reduced capacity food
courts (see
restaurants)
Open indoors with modifications
• Closed common areas
• Reduced capacity food
courts (see
restaurants)
Open Indoors with modifications
• Reduced capacity food courts (see restaurants)
Personal Care Services Outdoor Only
with modifications
Open indoors
with modifications
Open indoors
with modifications
Open indoors
with modifications
Museums, Zoos, and
aquariums
Outdoor Only
with modifications
Open indoors
with modifications
• Indoor activities max
25% capacity
Open indoors
with modifications
• Indoor activities max
50% capacity
Open indoors
with modifications
Places of Worship Outdoor Only with modifications Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 25% capacity or
100 people, whichever
is fewer
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 50% capacity or
200 people, whichever
is fewer
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 50% capacity
Movie Theaters Outdoor Only
with modifications
Open Indoors
with modifications
• Max 25% capacity or
100 people, whichever
is fewer
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 50% capacity or
200 people, whichever
is fewer
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 50% capacity
Hotels and Lodging Open with modifications Open
with modifications
• +Fitness centers
(+10%)
Open
with modifications
• +Fitness centers
(+25%)
• +Indoor pools
Open
with modifications:
• +Fitness Centers (50%)
• +Spa facilities etc
Gyms and Fitness Centers Outdoor Only
with modifications
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 10% capacity
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 25% capacity
• +indoor pools
Open indoors
with modifications
• +Saunas
• +Spas
• +Steam rooms
• Max 50% capacity
Restaurants Outdoor Only
with modifications
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 25% capacity or
100 people, whichever
is fewer
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 50% capacity or
200 people, whichever
is fewer
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 50% capacity
Wineries Outdoor Only with modifications Outdoor Only with modifications Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 25% capacity
indoors, or 100 people,
whichever is fewer
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 50% capacity or
200 people indoors,
whichever is fewer
Bars, Breweries, and
Distilleries
(where no meal provided)
(follow restaurants where
meal is provided)
Closed Closed Open Outdoors
with modifications
Open indoors with
modifications
• Max 50% capacity
Family Entertainment Centers Outdoor Only
with modifications
e.g.
• Kart Racing
• Mini Golf
• Batting Cages
Outdoor Only
with modifications
e.g.
• Kart Racing
• Mini Golf
• Batting Cages
Open Indoors for naturally
distanced activities
with modifications
• Max 25% capacity
• Bowling Alleys
• Climbing Walls
Open indoors for activities
with increased risk of
proximity and mixing
with modifications
• Max 50% capacity
• Arcade Games
• Ice and roller skating
• Indoor playgrounds
Cardrooms, Satellite Wagering Outdoor Only with modifications Outdoor Only with modifications Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 25% capacity
Open indoors
with modifications
• Max 50% capacity
Offices Remote Remote Open indoors
with modifications
• Encourage telework
Open indoors
with modifications
• Encourage telework
Professional Sports Open
• Without live audiences
• With modifications
Open
• Without live audiences
• With modifications
Open
• Without live audiences
• With modifications
Open
• Without live audiences
• With modifications

Commercial Evictions and Mortgage Relief

  1. On September 24, Governor Newsom issued an executive order extending authorization for local governments to halt commercial evictions for renters impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, through March 31, 2021. See: http://cert1.mail-west.com/anmc7rmvTyjiG/myuzj/Tgt/04dv8of71v/9u2/nqvTluq/Tqv/tmwj9cl7hof71v/knrwr?_c=d%7Cze7pzanwmhlzgt%7C17sbu7yp9wjzgax&_ce=1601269729.0d3123ef7f5c7ab648e5f09ac066af93. NOTE: The “Tenant, Homeowner, and Small Landlord Relief and Stabilization Act of 2020” was signed into law in California on August 31, providing tenants and landlords with additional stopgap protections from the State of California that are meant to help Californians in need until Federal aid comes through. The legislation provides that: (i) tenants financially impacted by COVID-19 cannot be evicted for missed rent between March and August 31, but must pay 25% of their rent between September 1 and January 31, 2021 to avoid being evicted in February; (ii) evictions for lease violations other than non-payment of rent can proceed on September 2; (iii) renters are legally liable for all missed rent and landlords can pursue missed payments in small claims courts starting March 1, 2021; and (iv) small landlords suffering from missed rent payments are also protected from foreclosure. See: https://www.emergencyslo.org/en/eviction-clarification.aspx. See also: https://www.gov.ca.gov/2020/08/31/governor-newsom-signs-statewide-covid-19-tenant-and-landlord-protection-legislation/. Additionally, the CDC announced on September 1, a temporary residential eviction halt at the national level through December 31 in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19; however, the CDC order does not relieve any individual of any obligation to pay rent, make a housing payment or comply with any other obligation that the individual may have under a tenancy, lease or similar contract: https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2020-19654.pdf.
  2. Citigroup, JP Morgan Chase, US Bank, Wells Fargo, and others are offering mortgage payment forbearances of up to 90 days, which allow you to reduce or delay your monthly mortgage payment in addition to waiving or refunding mortgage-related late fees. See: https://dbo.ca.gov/covid19-updates-fi/.

Technical Resources

  1. The Office of Business and Economic Development Entrepreneurship Task Force has launched a series of COVID-19 Rapid Response Virtual Sessions to engage with small business owners and entrepreneurs across the state to discuss issues, challenges, and barriers and share ideas and solutions. See: https://business.ca.gov/advantages/small-businessinnovation-and-entrepreneurship/help-us-advance-entrepreneurship/.
  2. The EDD’s Rapid Response teams provide early intervention assistance to help avert potential layoffs, and immediate onsite services to assist workers facing job losses. These services are carried out by state and local workforce development agencies in partnership with the America’s Job Center of California network. See: https://export connect.org/en/products/v/covid19/california-rapid-response-for-businesses. Employers are encouraged to contact their local America’sJob Center of California to learn more about whether Rapid Response can help them navigate through the COVID-19 crisis. See: https://www.careeronestop.org/LocalHelp/AmericanJobCenters/find-american-job-centers.aspx.
  3. The California Lawyers Association has prepared a variety of videos for the public, addressing various legal issues that are arising as a result of COVID-19. Such video topics include employee benefits and employee health and safety issues and small business employer issues. See: https://calawyers.org/covid-19-public-resources/#videos.

Tax Filing and Business Reporting Extensions

  1. State Income Tax Exclusion for PPP Recipients: On September 9, 2020, Governor Newsom signed into law Bill AB-1577, which allows small business owners who have received PPP Loans to exclude any income earned from PPP Loans from such small business owners’ state income tax bill, for taxable years beginning on and after January 1, 2020. See also: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201920200AB1577.
  2. Small Business Hiring Tax Credit: On September 9, 2020, Governor Newsom signed into law Bill SB-1447, which allows qualified small business employers to be eligible to apply for a credit reservation against the personal income and corporate income taxes of such small business employer for each taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2020 and before January 1, 2021, in an amount of $1,000 for each net increase in qualified employees, not to exceed $100,000 per small business employer. Qualified small business employers are defined as taxpayers that (i) as of December 31, 2019, employed a total of 100 or fewer employees, and (ii) had a 50% decrease in gross receipts over the three month period beginning April 1, 2020 and ending June 30, 2020, compared to the same three-month period in 2019. To receive the hiring tax credit, the qualified small business employer must submit an application to the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration for a tentative credit reservation under the bill that includes, among other things, whether the qualified small business employer is making the irrevocable election. The California Department of Tax and Fee Administration will allocate the credit reservations on a first-come, first-served basis and the total available tax credit is capped at an aggregate amount of $100,000,000. See also: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201920200SB1447. The Franchise Tax Board has postponed the tax filing and payment deadlines for businesses until July 15, 2020. See: https://www.ftb.ca.gov/about-ftb/newsroom/news-releases/2020-3-state-postpones-tax-deadlines-until-july-15-due-to-the-covid-19-pandemic.html.

Financial Resources

  1. California Small Business COVID-19 Relief Grant Program is providing grant-funding ranging from $5,000 to $25,000 to businesses and non-profits. NOTE: Round 4 (for nonprofit cultural institutions only) of applications opened March 16, 2021 and closes March 23, 2021; Round 5 will open March 25, 2021 and close March 31, 2021. See: https://careliefgrant.com/
    1. The California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce is hosting a webinar in Spanish regarding the California Relief Grant. During the presentation we are going step by step on how to complete the application on line. Please visit the following registration link: http://bit.ly/3rQHNqJ.
  2. The California Capital Access Program (CalCAP)’s Loan Loss Reserve Program is providing up to 100% coverage on losses as a result of certain loan defaults. Individual borrowers are limited to a maximum of $2.5 million enrolled over a three-year period. See: https://www.treasurer.ca.gov/cpcfa/calcap/sb/index.asp. Qualifying small businesses should contact a participating lender to enroll: https://www.treasurer.ca.gov/cpcfa/calcap/sb/institutions.pdf.
  3. The California Small Business Disaster Relief Loan Guarantee Program will provide loan guarantees for up to 95% of the amount of a loan for up to 7 years. See: https://www.ibank.ca.gov/small-business-finance-center/.
    1. To qualify, the entity must be located in California and either a nonprofit or a small business employing less than 750 people that has been negatively impacted or experienced disruption by COVID-19 or be an eligible nonprofit.
    2. Applications are done through participating lenders, and the loan interest rates and additional terms or qualifications are negotiated directly with the lender.
  4. The Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program helps unemployed Californians who are business owners, selfemployed, independent contractors, and others not usually eligible for regular state UI benefits. The provisions of the program include: (i) up to 39 weeks of benefits, (ii) an additional $600 to each PUA weekly benefit amount you may be eligible to receive, as part of the separate CARES Act Pandemic Additional Compensation program, and (iii) a new, 13-week federal extension for those who run out of their regular state-provided UI benefits (maximum 26 weeks). See: https://edd.ca.gov/about_edd/coronavirus-2019.htm.

General Resources

  1. The State of California maintains a COVID-19 website, which provides information and guidance to businesses and employers. See: https://covid19.ca.gov/.
  2. The California Governor’s Office has compiled a guide to financial and technical assistance, labor and workforce support, and business tax filing deadline extensions. See: https://business.ca.gov/coronavirus-2019/.
  3. The California Governor’s Office has issued an FAQ on available resources for California small businesses. See: https://static.business.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/FAQ-for-Small-Businesses-3.25.2020.pdf.
  4. The California Employment Development Department has issued information for workers, caregivers, and employers. See: https://www.edd.ca.gov/about_edd/coronavirus-2019.htm.
  5. The California Employment Development Department has developed an FAQ on disability/paid family leave, unemployment insurance benefits, and employer information. See: https://www.edd.ca.gov/about_edd/coronavirus-2019/faqs.htm. Additionally, there is a resource to estimate potential unemployment benefit. See: https://edd.ca.gov/unemployment/UI-Calculator.htm.
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